Cell Phone RF Warnings

Motorola Android

Operational Precautions

For optimal mobile device performance, and to be sure that human exposure to RF energy does not exceed the guidelines set forth in the relevant standards, always follow these instructions & precautions.

Product Operation

When placing or receiving a phone call, hold your mobile device just like you would a landline phone.

If you wear the mobile device on your body, always place the mobile device in a Motorola-supplied or approved clip, holder, holster, case, or body harness. If you do not use a body-worn accessory supplied or approved by Motorola, keep the mobile device and its antenna at least 2.5 centimeters (1 inch) from your body when transmitting.

Using accessories not supplied or approved by Motorola may cause your mobile device to exceed RF energy exposure guidelines. For a list of Motorola-supplied or approved accessories, visit our website at: www.motorola.com.

iPhone 4

Exposure to Radio Frequency Energy

iPhone contains radio transmitters and receivers. When on, iPhone receives and sends out radio frequency (RF) energy through its antennas. The iPhone cellular antenna is located at the bottom edge of iPhone, to the left of the Home button.

The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth® antenna is located at the top edge of iPhone, to the right of the headset jack.

For optimal mobile device performance and to be sure that human exposure to RF energy does not exceed the FCC, IC, and European Union guidelines, always follow these instructions and precautions: When on a call using the built-in audio receiver in iPhone, hold iPhone with the dock connector pointed down toward your shoulder to increase separation from the antenna. When using iPhone near your body for voice calls or for wireless data transmission over a cellular network, keep iPhone at least 15 mm (5/8 inch) away from the body, and only use carrying cases, belt clips, or holders that do not have metal parts and that maintain at least 15 mm (5/8 inch) separation between iPhone and the body. iPhone is designed and manufactured to comply with the limits for exposure to RF energy set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States, Industry Canada (IC) of Canada, and regulating entities of Japan, the European Union, and other countries. The exposure standard employs a unit of measurement known as the specific absorption rate, or SAR. The SAR limit applicable to iPhone set by the FCC is 1.6 watts per kilogram (W/kg), 1.6 W/kg by Industry Canada, and 2.0 W/kg by the Council of the European Union. Tests for SAR are conducted using standard operating positions (i.e., at the ear and worn on the body) specified by these agencies, with iPhone transmitting at its highest certified power level in all tested frequency bands. Although SAR is determined at the highest certified power level in each frequency band, the actual SAR level of iPhone while in operation can be well below the maximum value because iPhone adjusts its cellular transmitting power based in part on proximity to the wireless network. In general, the closer you are to a cellular base station, the lower the cellular transmitting power level.

iPhone has been tested, and meets the FCC, IC, and European Union RF exposure guidelines for cellular, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth operation

iPhone’s SAR measurement may exceed the FCC exposure guidelines for body-worn operation if positioned less than 15 mm (5/8 inch) from the body (e.g., when carrying iPhone in your pocket).

If you are still concerned about exposure to RF energy, you can further limit your exposure by limiting the amount of time using iPhone, since time is a factor in how much exposure a person receives, and by using a hands-free device and placing more distance between your body and iPhone, since exposure level drops off dramatically with distance.

iPhone 5

(Settings > General > About > Legal > RF Exposure)

iPhone has been tested and meets applicable limits for Radio Frequency (RF) exposure.

Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) refers to the rate at which the body absorbs RF energy. SAR limits are 1.6 Watts per Kilogram (over a volume containing a mass of 1 gram of tissue) in countries that follow the United States FCC limit and 2.0 W/Kg (averaged over 10 grams of tissue) in countries that follow the Council of the European Union limit. During testing, iPhone radios are set to their highest transmission levels and placed in positions that simulate use against the head, with no separation, and near the body, with 10 mm separation.

To reduce exposure to RF energy, use a hands-free option, such as the built-in speakerphone, the supplied headphones, or other similar accessories. Carry iPhone at least 10 mm away from your body to ensure exposure levels remain at or below the as-tested levels. Cases with metal parts may change the RF performance of the device, including its compliance with RF exposure guidelines, in a manner that has not been tested or certified.

SAR values for this device are available at: www.apple.com/legal/rfexposure/iPhone5,1/en/

Although this device has been tested to determine SAR in each band of operation, not all bands are available in all areas. Bands are dependent on your service provider’s wireless and roaming networks.

iPad

Exposure to Radio Frequency Energy

iPad contains radio transmitters and receivers. When on, iPad sends and receives radio frequency (RF) energy through its antenna. The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth® antennas are located behind the screen to the left of the Home button, and behind the Apple logo. iPad has been tested and meets the SAR exposure requirements for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth operation.

A cellular antenna is located at the top edge of the iPad Wi-Fi + 3G, when oriented with the Home button at the bottom. For optimal mobile device performance and to be sure that human exposure to RF energy does not exceed the FCC, IC, and European Union guidelines, always follow these instructions and precautions: Orient the device in portrait mode with the Home button at the bottom of the display, or in landscape mode with the cellular antenna (located under the black edge at the top of the device) away from your body or other objects. iPad Wi-Fi + 3G is designed and manufactured to comply with the limits for exposure to RF energy set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the United States, Industry Canada (IC) of Canada, and regulating entities of Japan, the European Union, and other countries. The exposure standard employs a unit of measurement known as the specific absorption rate, or SAR. The SAR limit applicable to iPad Wi-Fi + 3G set by the FCC is 1.6 watts per kilogram (W/kg), 1.6 W/kg by Industry Canada, and 2.0 W/kg by the Council of the European Union. Tests for SAR are conducted using standard operating positions specified by these agencies, with iPad Wi-Fi + 3G transmitting at its highest certified power level in all tested frequency bands. Although SAR is determined at the highest certified power level in each frequency band, the actual SAR level of iPad Wi-Fi + 3G while in operation can be well below the maximum value because iPad Wi-Fi + 3G adjusts its cellular transmitting power based in part on proximity to the wireless network and orientation. In general, the closer you are to a cellular base station, the lower the cellular transmitting power level.

iPad Wi-Fi + 3G has been tested and meets the FCC, IC, and European Union RF exposure guidelines for cellular operation.

If you are still concerned about exposure to RF energy, you can further limit your exposure by limiting the amount of time using iPad Wi-Fi + 3G in wireless mode, since time is a factor in how much exposure a person receives, and by placing more distance between your body and iPad Wi-Fi + 3G, since exposure level drops off dramatically with distance.

Blackberry Torch

Exposure to radio frequency signals

The BlackBerry® device radio is a low power radio transmitter and receiver. When the BlackBerrydevice radio is turned on, it receives and also sends out radio frequency (RF) signals. The BlackBerry device is designed to comply with Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC), and Industry Canada (IC) guidelines respecting safety levels of RF exposure for wireless devices, which in turn are consistent with the following safety standards previously set by Canadian, U.S., and international standards bodies:

  • ANSI®/IEEE® C95.1, 1999, American National Standards Institute/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz
  • National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report 86, 1986, Biological Effects and Exposure Criteria for Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields
  • Health Canada, Safety Code 6, 1999, Limits of Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields in the Frequency Range from 3 kHz to 300 GHz
  • EN 50360, 2001, Product standard to demonstrate the compliance of mobile phones with the basic restrictions related to human exposure to electromagnetic fields (300 MHz to 3 GHz)
  • International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), 1998, Guidelines for Limiting Exposure to Time-Varying Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic fields (up to 300 GHz)
  • Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU), 1999, Council Recommendation of 12 July 1999 on the limitation of exposure of the general public to electromagnetic fields (0 Hz to 300 GHz)
  • MIC, 2001, Article 14-2 of the Ordinance for Regulating Radio Equipment

To maintain compliance with FCC, IC, MIC, and EU RF exposure guidelines when you carry the BlackBerry device on your body, use only accessories equipped with an integrated belt clip that are supplied or approved by Research In Motion (RIM). Use of accessories that are not expressly approved by RIM might violate FCC, IC, and EU RF exposure guidelines and might void any warranty applicable to the BlackBerry device. If you do not use a body-worn accessory equipped with an integrated belt clip supplied or approved by RIM when you carry the BlackBerry device, keep the BlackBerry device at least 0.98 in. (25 mm) from your body when the BlackBerry device is transmitting. When using any data feature of the BlackBerry device, with or without a USB cable, hold the BlackBerry device at least 0.98 in. (25 mm) from your body. If you use a body-worn accessory not supplied by RIM when you carry the BlackBerry device, verify that the accessory does not contain metal and keep the BlackBerry device at least 0.98 in. (25 mm) from your body when the BlackBerry device is transmitting. To reduce radio frequency (RF) exposure consider these safety guidelines:

  • Use the BlackBerry device in areas where there is a strong wireless signal. The indicator that provides information about the strength of the wireless signal is located in the upper-right corner of the Home screen and displays five ascending bars. Three or more bars indicate a strong signal. A reduced signal display, which might occur in areas such as an underground parking structure or if you are traveling by train or car, might indicate increased power output from your BlackBerry device as it attempts to connect to a weak signal.
  • Use hands-free operation if it is available and keep the BlackBerry device at least 0.98 in. (25 mm) from your body (including the abdomen of pregnant women and the lower abdomen of teenagers) when the BlackBerry device is turned on and connected to the wireless network. For more information about carrying your BlackBerry device, see the holster information in the "Additional safety guidelines" section of this document.
  • Reduce the amount of time spent on calls.

Specific absorption rate data

THIS WIRELESS DEVICE MODEL MEETS GOVERNMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR EXPOSURE TO RADIO WAVES WHEN USED AS DIRECTED IN THIS SECTION.

The BlackBerry® device is a radio transmitter and receiver. It is designed and manufactured not to exceed the emission limits for exposure to radio frequency (RF) energy set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) of the U.S. Government, Industry Canada of the Canadian Government (IC),and recommended by The Council of the European Union when used as directed in the previous section. These limits are part of comprehensive guidelines and establish permitted levels of RF energy for the general population. The guidelines are based on standards that were developed by independent scientific organizations through periodic and thorough evaluation of scientific studies. The exposure standard for wireless devices employs a unit of measurement known as the Specific Absorption Rate, or SAR. The SAR limit set by the FCC/IC is 1.6W/kg*. The SAR limit recommended by The Council of the European Union is 2.0W/kg**. Tests for SAR are conducted using standard operating positions specified by the FCC/IC with the device transmitting at its highest certified power level in all tested frequency bands. Although the SAR is determined at the highest certified power level, the actual SAR level of the device while operating can be well below the maximum value. This is because the device is designed to operate at multiple power levels so as to use only the power required to reach the network. In general, the closer you are to a wireless base station antenna, the lower the power output. Before a wireless device model is available for sale to the public, it must be tested and certified to the FCC, IC, and The Council of the European Union that it does not exceed the limit established by the government-adopted requirement for safe exposure under the recommendations of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The tests are performed in positions and locations (for example, at the ear and worn on the body) as required by the FCC, IC, and The Council of the European Union for each model…

Body-worn measurements differ among wireless device and phone models, depending upon available accessories and FCC, IC, and The Council of the European Union requirements

The long-term characteristics or the possible physiological effects of Radio Frequency Electromagnetic fields have not been evaluated by Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL)

Motorola (M900 Fixed Mobile Car Phone – 2005)

Exposure To Radio Frequency (RF) Energy

Your phone contains a transmitter and a receiver. When it is ON, it receives and transmits RF energy. When you communicate with your phone, the system handling your call controls the power level at which your phone transmits. Your Motorola phone is designed to comply with local regulatory requirements in your country concerning exposure of human beings to RF energy.

Operational Precautions

To assure optimal phone performance and make sure human exposure to RF energy is within the guidelines set forth in the relevant standards, always adhere to the following procedures.

External Antenna Care

Use only the supplied or Motorola-approved replacement antenna. Unauthorised antennas, modifications, or attachments could damage the phone. Do NOT hold the external antenna when the phone is IN USE. Holding the external antenna affects call quality and may cause the phone to operate at a higher power level than needed. In addition, use of unauthorised antennas may result in non-compliance with the local regulatory requirements in your country.

Safety and General Information

Body-Worn Operation

To maintain compliance with RF energy exposure guidelines make sure that there is a distance of 20cm from the antenna to the user.

Approved Accessories

Use of accessories not approved by Motorola, may cause your phone to exceed RF energy exposure guidelines. For a list of approved Motorola accessories, visit our website at www.Motorola.com

Kindle Fire

Your device is designed and manufactured not to exceed the emission limits for exposure to RF energy set by the Federal Communications Commission of the United States (FCC). Information on your device is on file with the FCC and can be found under the Display Grant section of www.fcc.gov/oet/ea/ after searching on the FCC ID for your device, which can be found on the back of the device.